Tag Archives: korean

Spicy Korean Pork Belly

23 Sep

Maangchi posted a Spicy Stir-Fried Pork (Doejibulgogi) recipe recently and I knew that I had to try it out. The pictures were making me drool! It was such a simple recipe and the only ingredient I had to buy was the pork belly. *Warning – pork belly skin is ridiculously hard to cut.* Make sure you have sharp knives. Freezing the pork before cutting also helps. If you don’t like eating all that fat, go for the leaner pork shoulder.


I’ll re-type the recipe here the way I made it. By leaving out the hot peppers and pepper flakes, the heat is mild but still there. Check out the link above for her video!

Spicy Korean Pork Belly
adapted from Maangchi

Ingredients:
2 lbs pork belly, sliced into 1/4″ pieces
1 onion, sliced
3 scallions, chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 tsp fresh ginger, peeled and minced
1/3 cup Korean hot pepper paste
2 Tbsp brown sugar
1 Tbsp soy sauce
1/2 tsp black pepper
2 tsp toasted sesame oil

toasted sesame seeds
lettuce leaves for wrapping
cooked rice

Instructions:

1. Place all ingredients except for the sesame seeds and lettuce in a large, deep pan or wok.
2. Cook over high heat for 10-15 minutes, stirring to combine with a wooden spoon. Stir occasionally until pork is cooked through and onions are softened.
3. Serve with rice and use lettuce to wrap pork.
4. Eat!

Sailing, Kimbap, Shanghai Dumplings, Egg Tarts

15 Jul

I remembered to take pictures of sailing last Saturday at the Cal Sailing Club. It was my second sailing lesson and it went great! I hope that I’ll get a few more chances to go before I have to leave California. I already know that we probably won’t have a chance to go this weekend and then the next weekend, we were invited (last minute) to a wedding! I learned a lot this lesson because I got a chance to sail. Our instructor this time, Pierro, was a really detailed teacher. So far I know how to set the boat into the water from a raised dock, tie the boat to dock, rig the sails to be ready to sail, use the tiller (toward the boom = toward the wind, away from the boom = away from the wind), and tacking (changing directions when sailing into the wind). I just hope I can remember all the info the next time I go. I’m bad at sailing at the right angle to the wind (30 is best) but it wasn’t bad for my first time. I didn’t capsize or get seasick!

sail boats at dock

The boat I’m learning is the one with the purple sail in the picture above. It’s a 15-foot Laser Performance Bahia and can fit four people (instructor + 3 students).

the clubhouse

windsurfers and kayakers

Cal Sailing Club also has windsurfing lessons included in membership. You can also borrow wet suits, wet weather gear and PFDs (personal floatation devices).

After sailing, it’s lunchtime so it’s a nice reward to go find something yummy to eat. We ended up in south Berkeley this time where there are lots of cheap eats for college students. I really wanted kimbap for some reason so we stopped at Kimchi Garden for some. Brian was going to go for other stuff somewhere else but when we saw how big the order was, we ended up just having this and bubble tea. This whole order was less than $6!! The restaurant apparently has really bad reviews but my order came out really fast and tasted good so I’ll say it’s safe to order kim bap at least. It even came with kimchi and spicy fish cake.

super huge kim bap

Bubble tea was from Sweet Heart Cafe on the same block. I got the red bean milk coffee with tapioca, which was not bad. The coffee was strong and the red beans on the bottom were tasty. Brian’s vanilla milk green tea with tapioca was watery with a strong green tea flavor.

We then went to the area where Berkeley Labs is located, which has awesome views high up. The platform is right outside the Lawrence Hall of Science. You can see far from this view point. We can even see Berkeley Marina where we were sailing.

That night I didn’t feel like cooking so we ate out with Amanda’s family plus Kim who was visiting (Cornell friend). We ate at Shanghai Dumplings in Cupertino and had siu long bao a.k.a. soup dumplings (regular and crab), chow mien, rice cakes, and pork sticky rice in a hollowed out bamboo stem.

pork bamboo sticky rice in hollow bamboo

siu long bao, crab on the bottom

They were pretty tasty but the ones from Joe’s Shanghai in NYC were richer/fattier. The noodles at Joe’s Shanghai were also better but the food here was good. They even have a dumpling station where you can watch them make the dumplings.

On Sunday, Amanda’s Dad threw a World Cup Finals party. They had cooked up some salmon, chicken and kielbasa while everyone else brought a dish (there was so much food). Since I was unsatisfied with the dan tat from the cooking lesson, I made my own. I knew I had to make a lot and didn’t want to spend too much time on them so I cheated and used store bought refrigerated pie crusts (the rolled ones). For the filling I followed this recipe but added 3 Tbsp of sugar to the filling because it wasn’t sweet enough when paired with the salty pie crust. The crust in the recipe is supposedly very sweet. Make sure you strain the filling or you’ll end up with white spots from the egg white protein. I didn’t have a strainer so my first two batches had spots. This filling recipe makes around 48 egg tarts IF you use a regular sized empty can as a cookie cutter and re-roll pie crust scraps. I used up two packages of crusts (4 pieces total).

dan tat (egg tarts)

Bake at 375 F for about 15-17 minutes, depending on your oven. They should be done soon after they puff up. Stick a wooden skewer in them to test if the filling is set. You don’t want to overcook these because you’ll get tough eggs. I found that the ones that didn’t puff didn’t come out as nice (the egg had leaked below the crust due to overfilling or shaking the pan when putting it into the oven). Egg leakage meant soggy dark bottoms due to excess moisture and sugar. They were still edible but not very presentable.

in the oven

smooth, sweet custard

Even though the crust wasn’t authentic, they were a hit at the party! They were easy to make so I’m going to make more soon.

Taiyaki <fish waffles)<

4 Mar

taiyaki waffle
Taiyaki made with waffle batter.

My taiyaki pan finally arrived!! It took a week to get to me. Shipping was a ridiculous flat $10 for such a small pan. I got it off ebay from California. If someone knows where to find one in NYC please let me know for future reference. I searched all over Chinatown with no luck. I DID find a takoyaki pan for $12 at a restaurant supply on Bowery St. which is a lot cheaper than Kam Man on Canal St. Takoyaki =/= taiyaki. Too bad.

taiyaki in pan
The pan looks big but it’s actually not that big.

I tried two recipes. The first recipe was from Cooking with Dog on Youtube. I love those videos! I’ve never had real taiyaki except for the chibi-taiyaki from Sweet Breams in San Mateo, CA so I’m not sure what to look for. The batter from Cooking with Dog’s recipe is not that sweet which compliments the sweet store bought red bean paste inside. I actually messed up and did 100g of water instead of 100ml. The second batter was a simple waffle batter that had milk, oil, all purpose flour, a lot more baking powder and required whipping egg whites to fold into the batter. More work, more fat and actually didn’t taste as good as the Japanese recipe. I did half nutella and half red bean paste in this batch. If you can find red bean paste that’s in the pouch, I recommend that over the can. It tastes sweeter and is mashed not pureed so it’s more authentic. Or you can make your own.

taiyaki cropped
From the Japanese recipe.

I still have to work on cooking it properly to get it to crisp up without burning. Next experiment will be the recipe below with all purpose flour instead of cake flour and the correct amount of water.

taiyaki nutella
Waffle batter with nutella.

Taiyaki Batter

by Cooking with Dog

Ingredients:
100g Cake Flour (3.53 oz)
2/3 tsp Baking Soda
2 tbsp Sugar
1/2 Egg (30g/1.06 oz)
100ml Water (3.38 fl oz)

Directions:
1. Sift together flour, baking soda and sugar in a large bowl.
2. Whisk together egg and water.
3. Make a well in the flour and slowly pour in egg and water while whisking outwards to incorporate all the flour. This will prevent lumps.

Japanese + Korean + Cupcakes

28 Feb

I ate really well yesterday. Good thing I stopped counting calories because I probably ate enough for a couple of days.

Breakfast: bowl of whole grain cheerios with 2% milk.

Lunch: Udon with homemade dashi stock (bonito flakes, dried fish, dashi granules, soy sauce, mirin, sugar), char siu (roast pork), poached egg, cabbage, naruto, nori, scallions, and ichimi togarashi (pepper flakes).
udon bowl top
Close up of raw egg goodness and cute naruto swirls:
udon bowl
During a 5 hour karaoke marathon at Duet 48: a large Calpico soju (yum!), a big bite of everything in the box of Buttercup Bake Shop goodies Wendy brought, a cookie (the momofuku ones I made). Click on photo to see what each cupcake is.
buttercup cupcakes
Dinner: Pocha 32 in Korea town: along with pictures below, jap chae, seafood pajun (that they hid tons of jalapenos in.. not good, way too spicy), and a sweet/savory rice cake stir fry.

Whole squid stuffed with spicy pork:
pork stuffed squid
The stew we always get with ramen, rice cakes, spam, sausage, tofu, veggies, cheese..
korean stew pocha
Garlic breaded chicken:
garlic breaded chicken

My poor, happy belly. =D

Edit: Totally forgot about the watermelon soju!
watermelon soju

Jap chae/Korean noodles (Bento 9)

6 Feb

Laptop lunch for dinner at work. I made jap chae after Wendy threw the surprise party with Korean food. I think hers tasted better but this was my first time making it so now I know how to improve my methods.

bento 9

Jap chae, salad, red pepper, cucumber, goddess dressing, avocado and tomato “guac” (which got really brown and gross – didn’t end up eating this), and dove dark chocolate.

I asked Wendy for her recipe and she pointed me to Maangchi. I basically followed that recipe but approximated the vegetable amounts. Some tips from what I’ve learned: add salt to taste because the recipe didn’t call for salt but I feel like it needed it; don’t skip the step where she adds soy sauce to the spinach because my spinach was bland; definitely marinate the beef beforehand (soy sauce, sesame oil, cooking wine, sugar), overnight is best; and don’t forget the green onions like I did. Otherwise, quite a delicious and flavorful dish.

Surprise bday party! Tea recipe too.

31 Jan

My really good friends from high school threw a surprise birthday party for Eugene and I since our birthdays are close. My cousin, Wendy, cooked some incredible Korean food. I managed to only get pics of some of the food so there was more but everything was delicious.

jap chae
Jap chae which is glass noodles with mixed veggies and beef.

kalbi
Kalbi – delicious marinated beef short ribs.

kimbap
A whole bunch of kimbap or Korean sushi from the store. There were beef, spicy tuna, california style with spinach and a veggie one.

korean tofu
Carol helped Wendy make this bean paste tofu dish which was really tasty.

cheesecake
Carol bought us a cheesecake with fruit.

We also had a whole bunch of traditional Korean appetizers and I brought a homemade Korean drink that’s sweet and spicy. I first had this drink at Kun Jip in Koreatown and fell in love with it ever since.

Chilled Cinnamon Ginger Tea (Soojong Gwa)
Serves around 8-10.

Ingredients:
1/2 gallon water (divided into 2 pots)
3 sticks cinnamon (about 3-4″ each), rinsed
2-3 inches of fresh ginger, peeled and sliced
1/3 cup brown sugar + more to taste
1/3 cup white sugar + more to taste
pinenuts (optional garnish)

Directions:
1. Boil 1/2 the water (4 cups) divided into two pots.
2. Add the cinnamon sticks to one pot and sliced ginger to the other. Simmer on low for 30 minutes.
3. Remove from heat and discard cinnamon sticks and ginger. Combine the two liquids and add sugars. Stir until sugars are dissolved. Taste and add more sugar if necessary.
4. Chill until cold, preferably overnight. Serve cold garnished with pinenuts.

Note: You can boil the cinnamon and ginger in one pot but I’ve read that it’s better to do it in two.

Bunch of foods

12 Sep

Wow, I feel like it’s been a while since I last posted. We have an abundance of food in the fridge which prevents me from making stuff I want to make. Instead my mom cooks because those are mostly her groceries. =(

I meant to post something about Sept. 11 yesterday but I really didn’t want to think about it. By the time I realized I should post something anyway, it was past midnight.

Cindy got a free cookbook for recycling paper and stuff at Columbia. It’s called Food to Live By and it’s the Earthbound Farm Organic Cookbook by Myra Goodman. Looks great and is very informative about organic foods. Great looking recipes with photos, tips, and a story behind each one. The layout reminds me of a textbook because there’s so much stuff packed into it. The recipes mainly use common ingredients which is great but many recipes make large dishes which is great for large families but not for us. I guess if you live on a farm, abundance of fresh produce is not a problem. I’ve already bookmarked five recipes I want to try.

Here are some foods I’ve made recently. Most of it was for Cindy to bring to back to her dorm since she has no kitchen. Hopefully it freezes and microwaves up okay. The french onion soup was for dinner last night.

Baked Spring Rolls
spring rolls

Ingredients:

~36 Square spring roll wrappers (smaller size)
2 cups mung bean sprouts
2 cups napa cabbage, chopped
1/2 scallion bunches, chopped (~1/2 cup)
5 dried shitake mushrooms, rehydrated and chopped (~1/2 cup)
1 large garlic, minced (~1 Tbsp)
1 egg
Shrimp, shelled, de-veined, chopped (I used 11 shrimp or ~1/2 cup) – optional, more = more flavor
Salt, Pepper, a few dashes of soy sauce

Directions:
1. Mix all ingredients except wrappers.
2. Place wrapper with corner facing you.
3. Place ~ 1 Tbsp filling at corner facing you. Roll corner towards the center of wrapper. Fold in the two side corners. Continue rolling to the end in the direction moving away from you.
4. Brush baking sheets with oil. Place spring rolls on baking sheets. Brush with oil and bake at 350F until crispy, around 20-30 minutes. May need to turn on broiler to get it to brown.

These are kind of bland. Add more soy sauce, shrimp or other flavoring (like ginger) for more taste.

Pajun – Korean Pancake Version 2
pajun new

I made pajun again but this time I doubled the recipe and used less water. I used 3 cups AP flour, 1 cup rice flour and only 3 cups of cold water instead of 4 cups to make it thicker. This version has faux crab meat, scallions and scallops. Yummier than last time though still needs more flavor. =( I seem to have a problem seasoning food.

Sushi
sushi square

Same old sushi as usual but I tried wrapping it differently. This one has spiced ham, faux crab meat and avocado. The regular rolls had spiced ham, faux crab meat, avocado, cucumber, carrots and pickled daikon.

French Onion Soup
french onion soup

Recipe from Rachel Ray magazine Oct. 2008 issue.
Ingredients:
2 large sweet onions, thinly sliced
1 cup dry red wine
Two 14.5 oz cans beef broth
One 5 oz bag seasoned croutons (~2 cups)
4 thick slices Swiss cheese
olive oil
pepper

Directions:
In deep skillet, heat 2 Tbsp olive oil over med. heat. Add onions and cook until translucent and softened, about 15 mins. Add wine and bring to a boil. Pour in beef broth, lower heat and simmer for 10 minutes; season with pepper. Preheat the broiler. Divide soup up into four oven proof bowls, top each with 1/4 of the croutons and a slice of cheese. Set bowls onto a rimmed baking sheet and broil until cheese is bubbly and golden, about 1 minute.

Comments: I used beef bouillon cubes because I didn’t have beef broth. I think beef broth is essential, the cubes just don’t provide enough flavor and depth. I used only 3/4 cup wine but it was too much, the wine flavor was too strong. Next time I will use only 1/2 cup. I made my own croutons out of old Italian bread I had in the fridge with some olive oil, garlic and onion powders and Italian seasoning. Easy recipe and tasty.